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Duncansville (814) 696-3397


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Monday, 15 July 2019 00:00

Summer typically brings about a lot more activity in children. The warm weather means they want to spend time outside. Also, many sports start or continue in the summer months, such as basketball, tennis, running and soccer. Adults should be looking out for certain foot injuries in children so they can remain healthy. These injuries include ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis, tendinitis, corns and calluses. There are also a few preventative measures to take. You could tape the ankles to help with stability, and make sure the socks absorb moisture. As for shoes, some sports require specific types of shoes, and new footwear may need to be purchased, as children’s feet grow quickly. Children may not complain of pain, because they have not noticed it or they want to continue being active. Thus, adults should be observant of their children’s feet. If you suspect your child has a foot or ankle injury, it is suggested to consult with a podiatrist.

The health of a child’s feet is vital to their overall well-being. If you have any questions regarding foot health, contact Dr. Bert Altmanshofer of Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tips for Keeping Children's Feet Healthy

  • Make sure their shoes fit properly
  • Look for any signs of in-toeing or out-toeing
  • Check to see if they have Clubfoot (condition that affects your child’s foot and ankle, twisting the heel and toes inward) which is one of the most common nonmajor birth defects.
  • Lightly cover your baby’s feet (Tight covers may keep your baby from moving their feet freely, and could prevent normal development)
  • Allow your toddler to go shoeless (Shoes can be restricting for a young child’s foot)
  • Cut toenails straight across to avoid ingrown toenails
  • Keep your child’s foot clean and dry
  • Cover cuts and scrapes. Wash any scratches with soap and water and cover them with a bandage until they’ve healed.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Duncansville, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How to Care for Your Child's Feet
Tuesday, 09 July 2019 00:00

Plantar warts are small growths that appear on the heels of the feet. Pressure may make the warts grow inward beneath a thick layer of skin called a callus. Plantar warts are caused by HPV. The HPV virus is able to enter the body through tiny cuts, breaks or other weak spots on the bottom of the feet. Some signs and symptoms of plantar warts include lesions on the bottom of the foot, callused skin where a wart has grown inward and pain or tenderness when walking or standing. Children and teenagers are considered to be the most at risk to get plantar warts.  Although plantar warts are not considered to be a health concern, you should still see a podiatrist in order to have the warts removed.

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. Bert Altmanshofer from Pennsylvania. Our doctor will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Duncansville, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Warts
Monday, 01 July 2019 00:00

Sever’s Disease describes when a child undergoing a growth spurt develops serious heel pain. It is common with boys between the ages of 10 to 15 and with girls between the ages of 8 to 13. This occurs because during a child’s growth spurt, the heel bone outgrows all of the muscles, tendons and ligaments within the leg. Since these parts of the leg are unable to catch up to the growth pace of the heel bone, they can become stretched too tightly. If this happens to a child that is very active, it can cause extra strain to the already overstretched tendons in the leg and lead to intense swelling and pain. Some symptoms of Sever’s Disease include trouble walking, running with a limp, tightness and tenderness in the backs of the heels and heel pain that increases after running or jumping. Although Sever’s disease can last up to a couple months, it presents no long term foot problems and the simplest treatment for it is rest. It is important for the child not to participate in physical activities until the heel is back to being pain-free. If your child exhibits any signs of Sever’s Disease, it is recommended that you take them to see a podiatrist. 

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see Dr. Bert Altmanshofer at Pennsylvania. Our doctor can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Duncansville, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease
Sunday, 30 June 2019 00:00

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